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COOK, John, & John Maule.

An Historical Account of the Royal Hospital for Seamen at Greenwich, M,DCC,LXXXIX.

Published: London: Sold for the Authors by G. Nicol, T. Cadell, J. Walter, C. G. J. and J. Robinson; and at the Chapel of the Hospital, 1789

Stock code: 85988

Price: £750

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This item is on show at 43 Dover Street (map)

First edition. Uncommon. Reprints in full the original grants of William and Mary for the establishment of the Hospital, and offers a detailed description of the building works, and the finished structure, accompanied by a spectacular folding engraved plate of a river view taken from a drawing by Thomas Lancey. Lancey was placed at the Hospital school to be educated for the sea, but a dislocated hip prevented this, and he was employed as an assistant schoolmaster, in time becoming a master there (Newell, Greenwich Hospital: A Royal Foundation, p100 & p134). He apparently later published an Elements of Navigation for Greenwich School in 1808 (Taylor, 1173 no copy traced), and A New Set of Examples, for finding the Time at Sea in 1816. Cooke and Maule were successive chaplains to the institution. Bookplate of the Baggrave Library to the front pastedown. Baggrave Hall was the favourite home of Andrew Burnaby, “clergyman and traveller”, who was vicar of Greenwich from 1769 until his death in 1812.

Quarto (263 213 mm). Contemporary blue half morocco on marbled boards, flat spine, title gilt direct, compartments formed by an ornate gilt roll, and enclosing attractive floral devices. Extensive folding frontispiece and 3 other plates, without the final leaf with the announcement that, “The perspective view … will be delivered … as soon as finished”, and the errata slips as described by ESTC. A little rubbed particularly so on the joints, light browning, else a very good copy.

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