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SCROPE, George Poulett.

Principles of political economy, deduced from the natural laws of social welfare, and applied to the present state of britain.

Published: London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, & Longman, 1833

Stock code: 107194

Price: £1,500

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First edition. Scrope wrote numerous pamphlets on economical questions; he opposed the Malthusian theory of population, defended the Poor laws, advocated unemployment insurance and criticised the gold standard. In Principles of Political economy, called by McCulloch “a work of considerable talent and acuteness”, Scrope “proposed to correct the legal standard of value, (or at least, to afford to individuals the means of ascertaining its errors) by the periodical publication of an authentic price-current, containing a list of a large number of articles in general use, arranged in quantities corresponding to their relative consumption, so as to give the rise or fall, from time to time, of the mean of prices; which will indicate, with all the exactness desirable for commercial purposes, the variations in the value of money; and to enable individuals, if they shall think fit, to regulate their pecuniary engagements by reference to this Tabular Standard” (pp. 406-407).

Duodecimo (150 x 92 mm). Later smooth tan calf, blind triple rule border to covers, spine decorated gilt in compartments, morocco label. Engraved frontispiece map of the world. Library stamp of Queen’s College Oxford to title and final leaf, armorial bookplate of Robert Mason to front pastedown. Extremities lightly rubbed, boards with a little surface wear; a very good copy.

Bibliography: Einaudi 5198; Goldsmiths' 27877; Kress C.3610; McCulloch, p. 19; Palgrave III, p. 369; Schumpeter 489-90; Sraffa 5332; Sturges 58.

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