Cart
Home » Browse » Philosophy » (HUME, David.) HORNE, George. - A Letter to Adam Smith, LLD. on the Life, Death, and Philosophy of his Friend David Hume, Esq. By one of the People called Christians.
return to previous page
A Letter to Adam Smith, LLD. on the Life, Death, and Philosophy of his Friend David Hume, Esq. By one of the People called Christians.
  • 104700
  • 104700_1

Other Items by Hume, David

  • Oeuvres philosophiques de M. D. Hume. Traduites de l’anglois. Tome premier [- septième]. Nouvelle édition. Hume, David Oeuvres philosophiques de M. D. Hume. Traduites de l’anglois. Tome premier [- septième]. Nouvelle édition. 1788
  • Private Correspondence Hume, David Private Correspondence 1820
  • Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects. Hume, David Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects. 1764
  • Dissertations sur les passions sur la tragedie sur la règle du gout. Hume, David Dissertations sur les passions sur la tragedie sur la règle du gout. 1759
Browse more

(HUME, David.) HORNE, George.

A Letter to Adam Smith, LLD. on the Life, Death, and Philosophy of his Friend David Hume, Esq. By one of the People called Christians.

A new edition, published by desire of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.

Published: London: F. and C. Rivington, 1799

Stock code: 104700

Price: £350

Free Shipping Worldwide.

This item is on show at 100 Fulham Road (map)

Sixth edition. George Horne contended “that a man of Hume’s known opinions could not by any possibility be the good and virtuous man Smith represented him to be, for had he been really generous, or compassionate, or good-natured or charitable, or gentle-minded, he could never have thought of erasing from the hearts of mankind the knowledge of God and the comfortable faith in his fatherly care, or been guilty of ‘the atrocious wickedness of diffusing atheism through the land'” (Rae). Horne goes on to charge this “atrocious wickedness” against Smith too, an attack to which he never replied although Horne’s work went through three editions in 1777 alone, with a fourth in 1784 and a Dublin edition in 1786.

Duodecimo (171 x 102 mm), 36 pages. Modern library buckram, spine lettered gilt. A very good copy.

Bibliography: Jessop, p. 44; Vanderblue, p. 52.

Don't understand our descriptions? Try reading our Glossary