Cart

Search Results for "advanced"

Advanced Photography: Methods and Conclusions.

Advanced Photography: Methods and Conclusions.

April 18, 2013.

First edition, first impression. Inscribed by the photographer, To Angus McBean – thanks for your help! Andreas Feininger. McBean contributes images to pages 144 and 200. From the library of Angus McBean.2qw

Read more
Advance to Barbarism.

Advance to Barbarism.

June 23, 2015.

Second, expanded edition, first published in 1948, of this indictment of the Nuremberg trials. Presentation copy from the author, inscribed on the half-title: “To R. T. Paget, Q.C., with the acknowledgements of the author for inspiration and encouragement. F. J. P. Veale. Nov. 4. 1953”. Together with a typed letter signed from Veale to Paget discussing the case of Dr Josef Kreuzer (an SS-Standartenführer who commanded Einsatzgruppe G in Romania, Hungary, and Ukraine), and referring to his war crime case as “the most fantastic” [i.e. far-fetched], (dated Brighton, November 4th 1953). An interesting association copy as Paget was defence counsel for Field Marshal Manstein at Nuremberg. There are letters in the National Archives at Kew relating to Paget and the case of Kreuzer. Veale had been a well-known member of the British Union of Fascists before the war.

Read more
An Advancement of Learning.

An Advancement of Learning.

January 23, 2014.

First edition, first impression. A Dalziel and Pascoe mystery set on a campus.

Read more
Lockhart’s Advance Through Tirah.

Lockhart’s Advance Through Tirah.

August 21, 2013.

First edition.”In 1897 Lockhart was placed in command of the 40,000 strong Tirah expeditionary force, after Afridis attacked British outposts along the north-west frontier during the most serious outbreak of resistance to British rule in India since the mutiny. During the difficult extended fighting in the inaccessible mountains of Tirah, he skilfully conducted punitive operations against elusive Afridi and Orakzai fighters, armed with modern rifles. Though for the most part consisting of guerrilla warfare, the campaign also included such bitterly contested engagements as the attack at Dargai and the withdrawal of the 2nd division down the Bara valley. For his services he received the thanks of the government of India, was made a GCB, and succeeded Sir George White as commander-in-chief in India in 1898″ (ODNB).

Read more
The Advance of our West African Empire.

The Advance of our West African Empire.

July 1, 2016.

First edition, first impression, of this attractive eyewitness account of the Hut Tax War of 1898-9, in which the tribes of the recently annexed hinterland of Sierra Leone rebelled violently against British rule. Wallis (1873-1945) served in the conflict with the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), and was later appointed acting district commissioner of Sierra Leone in 1901 before serving as consul in Dakar and Monrovia. He was also the author of West African Warfare (1906). Uncommon in this condition.

Read more
Lingual Exercises for Advanced Vocabularians.

Lingual Exercises for Advanced Vocabularians.

July 21, 2016.

First edition, limited issue, one of 99 copies. This copy inscribed by Sassoon on the limitation page, “Nellie Burton, with love from S.S.” The recipient, Nellie Burton, was Robert Ross’s devoted landlord and a good friend of Sassoon’s, with whom he too took lodgings during and after the war.

Read more
Horn of Africa. [Advance proof copy.]

Horn of Africa. [Advance proof copy.]

December 18, 2015.

Advance proof copy of the first UK edition, inscribed by the author “For Benjamin Bruce, ‘Dink’, friend from the old days, and friend forever, Philip Caputo, Livingston, MT. August, 2013”. Benjamin “Dink” Bruce was a cult figure in Key West, the writers’ haven in Florida where Caputo moved “to write and fish” (McCarthy, A Book Lover’s Guide to Florida, p. 271). Bruce’s father had arrived in Key West at the behest of Ernest Hemingway in 1935, serving the author in a vague capacity of general fixer for some thirty years, and notably designing the dust jacket of For Whom the Bells Toll. His son “Dink” became a local character in his own right: “Bruce seemed to cross paths with every celebrity who came through Key West. He didn’t seek them out; they found him. In Key West, Dink Bruce was royalty” (McKeen, Mile Marker Zero: The Moveable Feast of Key West, p. 90). Livingston, an artists’ colony in Montana, was a popular retreat for many of the Key West set, among them Richard Brautigan and Tom McGuane. Horn of Africa was first published in the US the previous year.

Read more
A Brief Record of The Advance of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force

A Brief Record of The Advance of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force

April 18, 2016.

First edition, first impression, more commonly found in buff paper wrappers, O’Brien commenting that only “a few copies” were bound in cloth, scarce in this state. A “collaborator’s copy” bearing the name of Corporal E. W. Grater on the official compliments slip pasted to the front free endpaper, which is signed by the editor Lieutenant-Colonel Harry Pirie-Gordon. Grater is not a common name but is most commonly found in Devon. A number of battalions of the Devonshire Regiment served in Egypt, in particular the 2/4th Battalion Territorial Force which saw a number of actions as part of 75th Division of the EEF. We have found that a Private Arthur William D. Grater was killed in action on the Western Front in late September 1918 while serving with the 1/5th Devonshires. A Brief Record is a thorough account of the advance of the EEF from July 1917 and the end of October 1918, containing many articles, two of which are by T. E. Lawrence (though unattributed) which, along with the reports in the Arab Bulletin and The Times, are Lawrence’s first published accounts of the Arab campaign. The Preface states that this record was created so that “members of that Force may be able to take home with them an acceptable account of the great advance in which they played a part”.

Read more
Pompeiana:

Pompeiana:

October 11, 2013.

A handsomely bound copy of Gell’s Pompeina, very attractively illustrated, with beautiful mythological studies and “views” of imaginatively reconstructed (and often rather romantically repopulated) Pompeii, the whole giving an enthusiastic impression of a beautiful, advanced, and rather sensual, civilisation. Gell originally worked, as architectural draughtsman, with architect John Peter Gandy on an archaeological survey of the classical Mediterranean, and their joint production, Pompeiana, originally published 1817-9, is (apart from William Hamilton’s notes) the first study in English of the excavation of Pompeii. The 1832 (of which this is the first Lewis 1837 reissue) edition was rewritten by Gell alone, and the focus of this production are the marvellous images, accompanied by Gell’s descriptive text. Though Pompeiana is Gell’s best known work , he also published the Topography of Troy and its Vicinity (1804), Geography and Antiquities of Ithaca (1807), Itinerary of Greece, with a Comentary on Pausanias and Strabo (1810); and Itinerary of the Morea (1816) and the Topography of Rome and its Vicinity (1834); and in these works contributed to the English reading public’s conception of the classical past during the Romantic period.

Read more
Voyage aux Indes Orientales.

Voyage aux Indes Orientales.

August 24, 2013.

First French edition, one year after the first London. An extremely interesting account of India in the mid-eighteenth century; “a compendium of observations on both English and Indian cultures … the declining power of the Mughal government, and its replacement with English measures. A plethora of observations on subjects such as trade, fortifications, public buildings, and relations with the French” (Riddick) these last probably accounting for its rapid translation. Born in 1732, the son of an immigrant Swiss jeweller; “After taking a course in writing and merchants’ accounts at J. Bland’s academy in Bishopsgate, Grose was elected a writer in the East India Company in November 1749 and arrived to serve in the Bombay presidency in August 1750. He was advanced to deputy secretary early in 1753, but his career ended soon after, when he was dismissed the service and sent home, ‘having been deprived of his senses for some months past, and there being no hope of his recovery'” (ODNB). His life thereafter was somewhat rackety, running through his inheritance in his father’s lifetime and being forced by debt to flee to France where he lived for four years. “His mother’s death brought another inheritance (though vested in two of his brothers), [when] he returned to England in 1774, but only after being imprisoned for attempting to travel without a passport and badly injuring one of those arresting him. No later reference to him has been found.” The editing, and augmentation, of this work for publication has recently been shown to be the work of John Cleland. In his “avertissement” the translator, Philippe Hernandez, remarks that Grose had been “plus … aidé” [greatly assisted] by “M. Cl.”, “homme célébre en Angleterre par ses productions, son style & son gout” [famous in England his works, style and taste]. Circumstantially this identification of Cleland as “a key collaborator or perhaps the text’s ghostwriter”could be seen as being confirmed by the fact that Hernandez was one of the editors of the Journal Étranger in which excerpts of Fanny Hill had been published in 1755. Further hard evidence has been traced by Hal Gladfelder, who publishes a letter sent by Cleland to his lawyer in 1757 asking him to obtain “some papers relating to” the East Indies, as a “Mr. Grose of Richmond” has “appl[ied] to me for some materials towards a treatise” on the subject (Fanny Hill in Bombay: The Making and Unmaking of John Cleland, pp34-5). He also identifies a great deal of “material that echoes his preoccupations and experience”: his etymological researches; his interest in the political effects of trade; “the extended accounts of Mogul seraglios and the dancing girls of Surat [which] are akin to passages in the Coxcomb and the Dictionary of Love” (p35); together with a somewhat malicious story relating to a sea captain, William Boag, with whom Cleland had tangled previously, which could have no other source. Represents Cleland’s only writing on his time in India.An interesting edition of an important text with typically tangled eighteenth-century origins.

Read more
Page 1 of 2012345...1020...Last »